Grease and Oil Change

Back in February of this year, I ran a workshop in my hometown of Trundle that focussed on health and wellbeing for rural people. With a very rural sounding name for the day – ‘Grease and Oil Change’ – it was an idea that came out of last October’s Mental Health Week. I took on the concept of talking openly about mental health and created a workshop for people who live out west and might not have access to stories and experts to help when times aren’t so hot.

The Dept of Primary Industries helped out with funding, as well as a few contacts, and basically we all met up at the Trundle Golf Club (60 people turned up – how wild is that? And yes, I was related to a good deal of them!) But it was heartening to see that lots of people want to make time to look after themselves.

There were a few experts and a few people that were happy to spread their message without a lot of experience behind them (and aren’t they usually the best?) It was a very inspiring day.

Since the workshop I have been sending out a monthly (give or take) newsletter to the participants to share any self help tips. I am the Queen of Self Help – got a course, a book, a podcast? Then count me in!) I love learning new ways to be a better person and I spend hours during the week reading and becoming inspired. Look, it’s a work in progress.

So anyway back to the newsletters…

Rather than reinventing the wheel, I thought I might pop the newsletter content right here on this blog. It might be up your alley and it might hold something that tweaks your interest. Who knows?

Grease and Oil Change News #1

Thanks so much to everyone who came along to last week’s workshop. It was a great catch up and there was a fantastic energy in the room.

The plan with these newsletters is to keep you updated with relevant information from the workshop. (And I promise not to overload your inbox)

Today’s update is all about food (why not?!) and includes the recipes from the cooking demo, along with some other bits and pieces that you might find interesting.

Sausage making

The art of sausage making…

RECIPES
So here are the recipes from the cooking demo: Grease and Oil Change Recipes (click on the link)

AND SOME OTHER STUFF…
Recently on Triple J Dr Karl interviewed Professor Clare Collins, Professor of Nutrition and Dietetics at the University of Newcastle. It’s a very interesting listen, covering a wide range of topics. Is a zero carb diet viable in the long term? Why am I eating more after quitting smoking?
Listen to it by clicking HERE

Here is the Healthy Eating Quiz that Prof Clare Collins refers to in the interview: Click on the link HERE

All ears

Eager participants…

Ruth and Gary

Ahhh, feeling the love.

Over and out…
Cherie

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Easter: 1 Christmas: 0

I have a theory – very recently put to the test – that Easter is way better than Christmas.

I know, I am really putting it out there (I like to focus on the big issues) but I speak from experience and felt it was a worthy topic for discussion. Oh and before we go on, this is not from the Christian perspective. Just so we’re clear.

You see, I am one of those tricky people that happens to get a bit carried away at Chrissy and puts a lot of emphasis on that one day. I have done it for the past couple of years – a slow learner indeed – and as soon as Dec 26 rolls around I am beating myself up about being so ridiculously fixated on that one day.

The ironic thing is that last year, with Christmas festivities being held at our house, I kept saying to anyone who would listen “We’re just keeping it really simple this year.” It was like a mantra and the more I said it, the more I tried to believe that I would put the words into practice. The only problem was that my mantra did not come to the party. I dithered about keeping the food simple (at least I did manage that) but by the same token I put a whole lot of emphasis on the people and the ‘feeling’.

I bombed out early (actually on Chrissy Eve) by deciding that was a great moment in the calendar year to bring up a couple of my big issues with my husband – clearly I had let my emotions get the better of me – and as a result things were rather ‘frosty’ between us for the following 24 hours. (Needless to say I am learning to time things a little better and not ‘awfulise’ things to such an extent.) But unfortunately the damage was done, and I spent most of Christmas Day regretting the previous altercation (but being far too stubborn to make amends.) It was Christmas at my house and I was going to have it my way. All day.

The presents made me feel a bit squeamish too – not so much for the adults as we have toned things down in recent years – but the little people were swallowed up by mountains of tissue paper, toys requiring 8 AA batteries and the question that kills me “Are there any more presents for me?” I was already in a delicate state, so this kind of overwhelm…well it started to overwhelm me. I held on for the day and managed to survive, only taking a couple of victims down with me.

Fast forward to Easter and things were a whole lot different. For the past few years I have taken off for the long weekend (there’s an idea) and the whole time has been about family and hanging out. The weather is dreamy, the eggs don’t come into play and the food is always tasty and not fussy. But most of all it’s about the people (and about 40 bazillion cups of tea).

So the take away message? For me, it’s about looking at and holding onto Christmas a little more lightly. (I think I may have been strangling it these past couple of years) and to keep loving Easter just the way it is.

Any questions or comments?!

Cherie

My non negotiables

I am a stickler for a daily rhythm & regular habits. It’s definitely my personality type (the official title of which I am still figuring out but I recently took Gretchen Rubin’s habits quiz and I am thinking the label ‘Upholder’ might suit me to a tee.)

This title comes down to my tendency to meet both external (those of others) and internal (my own) expectations.

I take on new habits easily and with gusto. If I read or hear about something that is going to be of benefit then there’s a fair chance that I’ll be hooked…possibly by the following morning. I might stick with the new habit for the long term (lemon water first thing in the morning) or they might come and go (coconut oil pulling.)

My days tend to run more beautifully if I can manage a few simple habits. Yes, there are many days when I don’t get to some of them, but I am getting better in making substitutions where possible.

And if my rhythm misses a beat, then that’s not the end of the world.

Going for a walk: Sage advice from the community nurses when Lenny was born. I don’t do it to get the heart racing, but I do stretch the pins and I see some lovely people on my travels.

Cooking breakfast: I thrive on food that is hot – whatever time of the year, whatever time of the day. Eggs, sausages, porridge, leftovers…you name it I can (h)eat it.

Having a bit of quiet time: Quiet time has become a bit of a catch cry in this house if things are a bit off the richter. “I’m just having a bit of quiet time” while steaming out the back door is code for “I am about to have a nervous breakdown.” So I am trying to head this feeling off at the pass by succumbing to quiet time of my own accord. This might be called meditating in some circles, but I prefer to calling it sitting down with my legs crossed and listening to my breathing.

Light entertainment: I will generally squeeze in something to thrill the senses each day. At the moment it is a combination of the following:

Nashville Y’all do yourselves a favour & watch this.

The Slow Home Podcast This is how Gretchin and I came to ‘meet.’

All the Light We Cannot See Our bookclub read.

Jetsetmama Checking in with this lady is good for the soul & the laugh lines.

 

What are your daily non negotiables? I’d love you to tell me in the comments section (because there’s a fair chance I’ll go and give them a crack)

Cherie

Fat Friday

Hey, it’s how we roll (sausage roll) around here – a tradition apparently – that every Friday the tradies forgo their wholesome sandwich for a revoltingly unhealthy pie/sausage roll/iced coffee combination for smoko that would make Sarah Wilson’s hair stand on end.

Sugar free it is not, but who am I to put a stop to what is apparently the most enjoyable part of the working week?

Gone are the grain bread, hand crafted, home cooked delicacies of a Monday through to Thursday. No, on Fridays the gloves are off.

Bill the Builder likes to prepare for this all important meal by beginning the day with only a light breakfast (a thinner spread of peanut butter on the toast, if you don’t mind) and then the usual break is pushed back by half an hour, so the anticipation really builds, and then it’s a matter of someone making the dash into town for the weekly feast of fatness.

Bill works with Dooey the Doer (who has never actually been referred to as that) and together they are working on the Northcote house. They specialise in renovating older style houses (which they might not realise) but this project is by far and away the most fun they have had in a while (I’m not sure about that either, but they seem to be smiling a lot.)

A lot of the recent work has been a bit fiddly (and not that memorable, or entertaining from a blogging point of view.) Nevertheless, I have taken a lot of photos of timber lately, with Dooey asking me just this morning if I didn’t have somewhere else to be – and that’s the funny thing, I don’t! School in the west doesn’t start back for another week, due to the exasperating heat that effects towns only 40 minutes away, but apparently not the rest of the state. So while I gear up for the teaching gig, it leaves me with a lot of time to stare at the internal corners being created, roof lines being constructed, ceiling beams being aligned and not to mention verandah boards going on. Like I said, riveting.

So here’s a quick snap shot of the week that’s been…complete with the Fat Friday feast.

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Dooey on a Friday.

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Very nice verandah boards

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The kitchen gets some windows, with more to come

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The ceiling. Amazing.

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Bill the Builder, thrilled to be enjoying the local refreshments.

Cherie